An introduction to the origins and history of the egyptian pyramids

Its magnificent pyramids still stand as a reminder of past glory. In fact, the Great Pyramid of Giza is not only the oldest by far of the original Seven Wonders of the Ancient World, but is the last one standing.

An introduction to the origins and history of the egyptian pyramids

But Romer himself uses "Ramesses," i. Since the modern practices are all idiosyncratic, Romer's inconsistency here is not surprising. Earlier Egyptologists had often used the Greek names, instead of linguistic speculation, but the trend now has been -- and I follow it myself in these pages -- to try a give something like what the contemporary Egyptian forms would have been, or at least something with a connection to the ancient living language.

Alan Gardiner tried to use Coptic as a guide, which he also knew involved a distortion, since the pronunciation of Coptic had clearly changed from the older language. Anyone using "Thutmose" continues this practice, since the "o" is a late development and the "th" Coptic or Greek.

All of this involves a dilemma; and for Romer not even to discuss the issue, and to act like names such as "Sesostris" are somehow illegitimate or absurd, is a kind of confusion, if not a deception. The Greek names themselves pose a dilemma, since different forms turn up in different writers, or even in the same writer.

We might continue to be puzzled, since the name in Herodotus,looks more likely to be derived from the name we see in Egyptian, namelywhile Manetho's name,doesn't. But Romer skates right over these intriguing complexities, without bothering to clue us in. Another oddity in Romer is this: The term 'Memphis' does not refer to the ancient city of that name, which did not exist during the period of history covered in this volume, but to the region that was the centre of the Old Kingdom state.

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It is defined today by the thirty-mile-long line of monuments that extend along the west bank of the Nile opposite modern Cairo from Abu Roash in the north to Maidum in the south Of course, the "modern sense" is irrelevant.

When the Greeks arrived in Egypt, long before there was a "modern sense" of anything, they had no difficulty identifying "towns or cities," which often bore names, like Sais,that had been used since the earliest days of Egyptian history, and whose names feature the generic determinative for a "town or city.

With Memphis, there are some different issues.

An introduction to the origins and history of the egyptian pyramids

One is that the city seems to have early born a name,that meant "White Wall," whose reference to its fortification would preclude it from embracing an area extending for thirty miles up and down the Nile. Despite other names for Memphis, "White Wall" stuck as the name of the 1st Nome of Lower Egypt, which includes the immediate area of the city, but not the long range claimed by Romer.

The aspect of its walls, long vanished in their original plastered mud brick, can nevertheless be examined in the enclosure wall of the pyramid of Djoserwhich is rightfully assumed to reproduce that of the nearby capital.

It could hardly be anything else. We might wonder if Romer is confused by something else apparently true, and relied upon by himself, that the Court for each King was seated in a palace adjacent to the construction site of his tomb.

That is probably how Memphis ended up acquiring the name"Enduring Beauty," derived, as we have seen, from the pyramid of Pepi I. As it happens, this pyramid was built at Saqqara, very nearly as close as possible to the site of the city of Memphis.

So the Court and the center of government were no more than a convenient walk a couple of miles from the metropolis of the nation. If business and residence grew up along the way, as is to be expected, the King's palace and the city might end up in appearance and fact as part of the same metropolitan complex.

Hence the application of the name. Similarly, although pyramid sites are scattered, Saqqara ended up containing the largest number of them, a good dozen. If Romer makes his claims about Memphis without any real evidence, he does at least have an argument, a very strange one.

His idea is that "towns and cities" proper did not exist before the existence of money and a cash economy, because cities require markets, and markets cannot exist with buying and selling with money.

He cites a character from Aristophanes who misses his native village, because it lacked buying and selling and, apparently money [p.

Thus, Romer says that Egyptian lacks words "for buying and selling" [ibid. We might also wonder why the Eloquent Peasant is taking his goods to market if he is not going to sell them, and markets didn't exist.

Romer doesn't like the word "taxes,"because, of course taxes involve money [p. Romer using "tithe" for "tax" is just silly.From one point of view South Africans cannot boast about building Axum, KMT, or Timbuktu, because they, as a group, played no role in it.

The only ‘race” in Ancient Egypt that built the pyramids was the Egyptians themselves.

The Christian Kingdom of Dongola

Beneath the Pyramids: Egypt's Greatest Secret Uncovered [Andrew Collins] on benjaminpohle.com *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Beneath the pyramids of Egypt lies a lost underworld of catacombs, hewn chambers, and cave tunnels. They are alluded to in ancient texts and Arab legends.

The Egyptian pyramids are ancient pyramid-shaped masonry structures located in Egypt. As of November , sources cite either or as the number of identified Egyptian pyramids. [1] [2] Most were built as tombs for the country's pharaohs and their consorts during the Old and Middle Kingdom periods.

Anyway, I don’t have a lot to write about today, so I thought I’d share a couple of interesting anecdotes about the pyramids of Egypt.

The first concerns a Maltese tourist at the Giza pyramids . Snefru’s was the first king’s name that was regularly written inside the cartouche, an elongated oval that is one of the most characteristic Egyptian benjaminpohle.com cartouche itself is older and was shown as a gift bestowed by gods on the king, signifying long duration on the throne.

Ancient Egyptian civilization is so grand that our minds sometimes have difficulty adjusting to it. If you're awed by the Great Pyramid, amazed by the magnificent golden mask and other treasures of Tutankhamen, curious about how this longest-lived of all ancient cultures has influenced us, or just intrigued by the mysterious hows and whys of all things Egyptian, then you must own this.

ancient Egypt | Civilization, Geography, & History | benjaminpohle.com