An analysis of the apology from socrates

Table of Contents Summary Plato's The Apology is an account of the speech Socrates makes at the trial in which he is charged with not recognizing the gods recognized by the state, inventing new deities, and corrupting the youth of Athens.

An analysis of the apology from socrates

The defence of Socrates[ edit ] Socrates begins his legal defence by telling the jury that their minds were poisoned by his enemies, when they the jury were young and impressionable. That his false reputation as a sophistical philosopher comes from his enemies, all of whom are malicious and envious of him, yet must remain nameless — except for the playwright Aristophaneswho lampooned him Socrates as a charlatan-philosopher in the comedy play The Clouds An analysis of the apology from socrates.

About corrupting the rich, young men of Athens, Socrates argues that deliberate corruption is an illogical action. That the false accusations of his being a corrupter of youth began at the time of his obedience to the Oracle at Delphiand tells how Chaerephon went to the Oracle, to ask her the priestess if there was a man wiser than Socrates.

The Impiety of Socrates

That when Chaerephon reported to him that the Oracle said there is no wiser man, he Socrates interpreted that divine report as a riddle — because he was aware of possessing no wisdom "great or small", and that lying is not in the nature of the gods.

After systematically interrogating the politicians, the poets, and the craftsmen, Socrates determined that the politicians were impostors; that the poets did not understand their own poetry; and that the craftsmen, like prophets and seers, did not understand the things they spoke.

In that light, Socrates saw himself as spokesman for the Oracle at Delphi 22e. As the defendant under trial, Socrates tells the jury that he would rather be himself than be anyone else. That in searching for a man wiser than himself, his questioning earned him the dubious reputation of social gadfly to the city of Athens.

Corrupter of youth Having addressed the social prejudices against him, Socrates addresses the first accusation — the moral corruption of Athenian youth — by accusing his accuser, Meletus, of being indifferent to the persons and things about which he professes to care.

Whilst interrogating Meletus, Socrates says that no one would intentionally corrupt another person — because the corrupter later stands to be harmed in vengeance by the corrupted person. The matter of moral corruption is important for two reasons: Atheist Socrates then addresses the second accusation — asebeia impiety against the pantheon of Athens — by which Meletus says that Socrates is an atheist.

In cross-examination, Socrates leads Meletus to contradict himself: That Socrates is an atheist who also believes in spiritual agencies and demigods. Socrates tells the judges that Meletus has contradicted himself, and then asks if Meletus has designed a test of intelligence for identifying logical contradictions.

Socrates repeats his claim that formal accusations of corruption and impiety shall not destroy him, but that he shall be harmed by the prejudiced gossip and slanders of his enemies. He tells the court of being unafraid of death, because his true concern is in acting ethically.

That people who fear death are showing their ignorance, because death might be a good thing, but that most people fear death as an evil thing, when they cannot possibly know death to be either good or evil.

Socrates says that his wisdom is in being aware that he is ignorant: That in a conflict of obedience to such authorities, obeying divine authority supersedes obeying human authority: That, as spokesman for the Oracle at Delphi, he is to spur the Athenians to greater awareness of ethics and moral conduct, and always shall question and argue, even if his accusers — Lycon, Anytus, and Meletus — withdraw their accusations against him.

Therefore, the philosopher Socrates of Athens asks his fellow citizens: That material wealth is a consequence of goodness; that the god does not permit a better man to be harmed by a lesser man; and that he is the social gadfly required by Athens: Socrates says he never was a paid teacher; therefore, he is not responsible for the corruption of any Athenian citizen.

That if he corrupted anyone, he asks: That if the corrupted Athenians are ignorant of having been corrupted, then why have their families not spoken on their behalf? In point of fact, Socrates indicates relatives of the Athenian youth he supposedly corrupted are present in court, giving him moral support.

Socrates concludes his legal defence by reminding the judges that he shall not resort to emotive tricks and arguments, shall not cry in public regret, and that his three sons will not appear in court to pathetically sway the judges.

Socrates says he is unafraid of death and shall not act contrary to religious duty. He says he will rely solely upon sound argument and truth to present his case at trial.

In the Apology of Socrates, Plato cites no numbers of votes condemning or acquitting the philosopher of the accusations of moral corruption and impiety; [11] although Socrates did say he would have been acquitted if thirty more jurors had voted in his favour.In Apology, Plato’s recount of Socrates’ predicaments in the hands of the jury is highly contemplative.

An analysis of the apology from socrates

In this paper, the writer presents an analysis of Apology in the understanding of various scholars and with an aim of arriving at an interpretive conclusion about this noble yet enigmatic account. Ancient Greek Philosophy. From Thales, who is often considered the first Western philosopher, to the Stoics and Skeptics, ancient Greek philosophy opened the doors to a particular way of thinking that provided the roots for the Western intellectual tradition.

The Apology is Plato's recollection and interpretation of the Trial of Socrates ( BC). In this dialogue Socrates explains who he is and what kind of life he led. Socrates' (and Plato's) point is that, once we understand what reality is (the forms), it is the job of the informed to lead the ignorant 'out of the cave' and into true knowledge.

1 Plato’s Apology of Socrates How you, men of Athens, have been affected by my accusers, I do 17a not know benjaminpohle.com my part, even I nearly forgot myself because of.

An analysis of the apology from socrates

Analysis of Plato's Apology. The Apology is Plato's recollection and interpretation of the Trial of Socrates ( BC). In this dialogue Socrates .

Socrates - Wikipedia